July Book Recommendations

WORDS Sara Putman, owner Bookish

Enjoy these five must-read books from our friends at Bookish, Fort Smith, Arkansas’s only independently owned bookstore.

The Book of Form and Emptiness
by Ruth Ozeki

Author Ruth Ozeki is a Zen Buddhist whose practices and philosophies are profoundly ingrained in her latest book. Benny Oh is dealing with the death of his father and begins hearing the murmuring of inanimate objects. It isn’t until he finds a book that shows him how to listen and find his own voice that his healing can continue. This wise and poignant novel will enable you to take a thoughtful look at the things that clutter your thoughts.

Tornado Drill
by Dave Malone

Malone’s collection of poems exhibits the nostalgia often associated with summertime reads. Whether it is pondering the poems of Philip Larkin or growing up in the Ozarks, the roots of Tornado Drill go deep into our shared experiences of growing up in the region. These poems unlock vivid memories of practicing tornado drills or hitching a ride in the back of the truck. Malone balances humor and grief and offers something new to discover even while relishing the familiar.

How to Raise an Antiracist
by Ibram X. Kendi

Kendi sheds light on his experiences growing up black in America and raising his daughter to be anti-racist. He’s candid and vulnerable about how difficult it can be to discuss race with our children – which is encouraging because he’s a pro. The chapters follow the stages of childhood and offer guidance to parents who are working to raise antiracist children. With accessible language and easy-to-follow guidelines this book is a must-read for parents or anyone who works with children.


This Poison Heart/This Wicked Fate

by Kalynn Bayron

We cannot get enough of this YA series full of adventure and centered on diverse and fascinating characters. There is so much wonderful world building and representation in this series that by the time you get to book two, Bayron has added threads of ancient mythos to the storyline. There is enough action to keep boys reading and the characters are so fantastic that readers of all ages will want to stick around to see what happens next.

 

Comments are closed.